Why Call Me By Your Name Book is Better Than The Movie

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If there is one LGBTQ+ movie that best defines the 2010s era, it is surely going to be snatched by Call Me By Your Name. Now, Call Me By Your Name was a phenomenon on its own. But the lasting effect of the film’s success was the everlasting career of Timothee Chalamet, the lead of this movie. Ever since his breakthrough performance in this movie, he starred in many films by big production houses and also got the precious opportunity to work with big names like Laura Den, Meryl Streep, Saoirse Ronan, Steve Carrell, and many more, he’s like the living and long-lasting impact of a global phenomenon that scratch its mark in history and live with us since then. But of course, it is because of the performance of the cast as well.

Timothee’s performance was indeed brilliant in mimicking and improvising the character of the lonely, insecure, but madly in love intelligent Italian young man named Elio Perlman. The choice of casting him was just an epic example of perfect casting. His on-screen love interest Armie Hammer is also downright decent in his acting as the mysterious foreign student spending summer in Italy name Oliver.

Call Me By Your Name successfully attained five Oscars nominations, including Best Picture, Best Original Song, Best Actor, Best Cinematography, and Best Adapted Screenplay. In the end, though, only James Ivory took the Best Adapted Screenplay for the movie. James adapted the screenplay from the book so smoothly without missing any details that we can feel the tension of every scene intensely. But the book itself should be appreciated more for this. Andre Aciman, the author of the book, collected so many vivid sceneries and created such complex characters that we can’t help but love. Here are reasons why we think the book Call Me bY Your Name is better than the movie.

Read: Timothee Chalamet Movies You Must Watch

 1. Incredible Prose

Andre Aciman, the writer of Call Me by Your Name

Andre Aciman writes in such a way that you wouldn’t get by any sentences without your heart getting touched by them. Those arranged by him makes the whole experience of reading the book feels so similar and yet so different from witnessing the motion picture version. Take a look at the excerpts from the book.

“There they were, the legacy of youth, the two mascots of my life, hunger, and fear, watching over me, saying, So many before you have taken the chance and been rewarded, why can’t you? No answer. So many have balked, so why must you? No answer. And then it came, as ever deriding me: If not later, Elio, when?.”

or perhaps the one prose near the ending of the book which Elio and Oliver were about to be departed:

“Twenty years was yesterday, and yesterday was just earlier this morning, and morning seemed light-years away.

Exactly, Aciman can definitely write, and he does it exceptionally. Proses like these are what you would not find in any second of the movie. The words haunt us like an echo of someone saying each word in front of our very ears.

2. It is more erotic and specific

Elio and Oliver at the beach

 Just in case if you think you are a hardcore Call Me by Your Name fan, you really have to feel the nuance of the book too. The movie didn’t change much pace nor scene from the book, but nonetheless, there are some scenes that didn’t make the cut to be shown in the movie, like the one when Elio and Oliver took a bath-time together and decided to take a look at their own feces. Now, we can understand completely why this one didn’t make the cut. Yes, the book is more brutal and erotic, but that’s the point of the movie. It not only explores the extraordinary love Elio and Oliver have but also its human aspect that creates such tantalizing feelings of relatability.

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3. Better Ending

Elio crying at the end of the film

An ending is a vital part of the movie. The movie version, tho, feels like a drag into instant sadness that feels too much ambiguous. In the book, you will feel the undescribable distance between present, past, and future due to the first-person narrative of the story. Both the book and the movie feel nostalgic, but the difference here is that the one is being captured in prose, and the other through cinematography and pictures. But we argue that the book itself has a lot more depth to the ending. Plus, there was actually more to the continuing story than just Elio sitting by the fireplace and crying his eyes out, you have to check the book to find out.



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